Resin and alcohol inks

How to use resin and alcohol inks

how to make resin and ink pendants

How to create uniquely patterned pendants by using resin and alcohol inks

resin supplies

Resin colors can be used for more than simply coloring the resin.  If you use alcohol based colors, you can use them to create unique patterns in the resin.  This is one of my favorite ways to create artistic resin jewelry charms!

Supplies used in this tutorial:

mixing white resin

To start, I mixed 15 ml of Resin Obsession super clear resin (10 ml Part A plus 5 ml Part B).  I added two drops of white pigment into Part A, then added an extra drop of Part B to ensure curing.

pouring white resin into mold

Not shown:  I prepped the mold with a light mist of Petrolease mold release 30 minutes before casting.

I poured a small amount of white resin into each cavity.  You don’t need much, only enough to cover the bottom.  Pick up the mold to move the resin around or use your stir stix to guide the resin into covering the bottom of each cavity.

Allow the resin to fully cure before pouring the next layer.

adding a clear layer of resin to a layer of white resin

Once the first layer has cured, mix another 15 ml of Resin Obsession super clear resin.  Apply it over the top of the cured layer of white resin.  You don’t want a thick layer.

adding yellow alcohol based color to resin

While the resin is still wet, add drops of the ICE resin tint to the mold cavities.  For the first layer, I like to start with lighter colors.  The drops from the bottle create circles approximately 1 cm wide.

adding inks to resin

Add drops of color as desired, but don’t go crazy.  You want to leave a little ‘white space’ for your next layers.

Let the resin to fully cure, or at least cure long enough that you can pour the next layer of clear resin without it blending with the inks.  In the case of the super clear resin, this was two hours.

adding blue ink color to resin with a pipette

Not shown:  I mixed another 15 ml of Resin Obsession super clear resin and added it to each cavity making sure the resin was an even, thin layer.

I wanted drops of a different size than the first layer, so I used a pipette to draw up some of the ICE resin tints.  I squirted it onto the wet resin.  I wasn’t delicate here.  I squeezed the pipette so it was like I was sneezing onto the resin.

Once again, the resin needs to at least partially cure before pouring the next layer.

using a hypodermic needle and syringe to apply ink to resin

I started the next layer by mixing and pouring another 15 ml of Resin Obsession super clear resin.

For the last layer, I wanted to have more control over exactly where the dots got placed. I used an insulin syringe (which has a 27 gauge needle) to draw up microdrops of color and place them exactly where I wanted them.

One more time, I allowed everything to cure.

sanding edges of a resin charm with a nail file

After demolding, I used a fine emory board to go over the sharp edges of the castings.

Like this post? You may be interested in  Mason jar coasters DIY

glue bails onto resin charms with E6000

I used E6000 to glue Aanraku leaf bails onto the resin charms.

If you haven’t used E6000 to glue on bails before, here’s a quick video showing you how:

resin and alcohol inks

I finished the pendants by hanging them on ball chains.

I’m thrilled with how the resin and alcohol inks came together.  Each pendant is a mini work of art!

resin and alcohol ink pendant detail

The pictures don’t do the pendants justice.  Seeing them in person, you can see the layers of resin and alcohol inks and how the pendants have depth to them.

What do you think?  Which color pattern is your favorite?

If you are interested in some of my techniques, this shows me in casting action:

 

7 Comments

Lucille Sanford

Love these pendants I need to get me some white resin mix . Thanks for the tutorial! Awesome as usual!

Reply
MamaA

Can you use regular alcohol ink or does it have to be intended for resin alcohol tints?

Reply
Katherine Swift

Alcohol inks will work, but depending on the color you use, may change colors in the resin. I have seen this happen with the pink/purple ones.

Reply
Christine

Hi, could you recommend inks to use and where you’ve found them for the best price. I’m brand new at this and in general what types you need. What does alcohol ink mean? Can you mix food coloring with resin? I’m just collecting all my stuff now to get into this. Thanks for sharing your beautiful work and helping others learn!

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*