Resin painting pendants

Resin painting pendants

How to make resin painting pendants 6 different ways

How to make resin pendants 6 different ways

If you have done resin painting for any period of time and you are anything like me, you will sometimes think that the drips on the table end up being prettier than the painting itself.  I lament that there should be a way to make these drips into wearable pieces of art.  Once we started selling this 6 cavity silicone pendant mold, I saw a way to get it done.

Of course I went off tangent a bit as I had some other ideas to try out too.

Not shown:  Before I mixed resin, I sprayed a light mist of Petrolease mold release over the mold and allowed it to dry for 30 minutes.

First layer pour

pouring white resin as a background for resin pendants

I mixed super clear resin with opaque white pigment.  For each pendant back layer, I wanted a white background.  Personally, I prefer this as I think it then makes easier to wear the pendant with any style or color of clothing.

pouring white resin and gold leaf into a silicone mold

I’m still on a gold leaf kick, so for one of the cavities, I mixed the white resin with gold leaf before casting.  I then let all the cavities fully cure.

Second layer pour

placing resin paint chips into a silicone mold

For the next layer, I mixed super clear resin and added it to each cavity.  Then, I picked some of my paint drippings to include in four of the pendant cavities which had been trimmed as necessary to fit.

Pro tip:  The best time to get these for a pendant project is when they are in the soft cure stage.  They are cured at this point, but bendable.  You can easily cut them with scissors.  If they have fully cured and are too hard, they will shatter when you try to cut them.  If that happens, you will need to use a jewelers saw to get an exact cut.

placing candy sprinkles in a resin pendant

This round pendant was going to be a little tough to get the paint pieces into, so I opted for candy sprinkles instead.  You can never go wrong with candy, right?  I mixed the candies with the clear resin, then filled the cavity.  Once I got it as full as I liked, I added a bit more clear resin to bring it to the top of the mold.

Not shown:  I sealed the candy pieces with a couple layers of resin gloss sealer spray and let them fully dry before putting them in the resin.

clear resin over layer of gold leaf and white resin

For the gold leaf pendant, I filled the cavity with clear resin.  Then, I let everything cure.

Third layer pour

adding alumidust powder to resin

For the paint pendants, I wanted to add a little more depth to them.  After mixing and pouring a third layer of super clear resin, I added Alumidust powder, Pearl Ex powders or silver halo glitter to the surface of the pendants and let them cure.

Finished resin painting pendants

resin pendants

Once they cured, I demolded all of my pendants.  This mold also casts with the bail opening in place.  You don’t need to drill these!

resin art pendants

To make these wearable, all I had to do was loop some small diameter leather cord (linen, rubber or something similar could also work here too) and add the appropriate ends.

resin pendant group

It’s a pretty group of pendants and didn’t require much work at all.

Like this post? You may be interested in  Resin Necklace tutorial - How to make a shimmer star resin pendant

Which one of these resin painting pendants is your favorite?

You can see a little more about how I made these resin painting pendants here:

 

One Comment

Holly R. Long

Thank you for explaining the process of resin jewelry . I’m currently looking for a new art projects to possibly sell online or flea markets.
Apparently this is quite popular at the PICKINS ( pronounced the way it is spelled) flea market in South Carolina. My sister lives in that area. There is a wide range of people that attend this weekly event.
Thanks,
HOLLYWOOD

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